'On/Off' Switch for Obesity-Related Cancer Found

by Robard Corporation Staff July 26, 2016


As research continues to show, the connection between cancer and obesity continues to be proven. However, researchers from the University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston believe they may have found an answer in stymieing the process of cancer growing in people overweight.

The answer comes in CXCL1, a signaling molecule that regulates cell trafficking. This is what researchers believe is causing all the trouble. When activated, this molecule attracts cells from fat to the tumor. Furthermore, the cells they attract — adipose stromal cells (ASC) — support tumor-nourishing blood vessels. As a result, the tumor is fed and continues to become more malignant.

So the question is what happens when you block CXCL1 from the tumor? That’s what the researchers sought out to find. The researchers primarily focused on prostate cancer. They originally tested their theory on mice with favorable results. In this test, they actually saw the progression of the tumor decrease when the molecule was blocked, so they decided to then move on to see what the molecule levels were in humans.

What they found was CXCL1 was higher in the overweight patient when compared to a patient that wasn’t overweight. This means that the overweight patient has a higher chance of a tumor developing and increasing as compared to a person who isn’t overweight. Researchers are calling this mechanism an “on/off switch” and believe that it can play a key role in cancer treatment, particularly those that are overweight.

“As the prevalence of obesity is rising, insights into the mechanisms underlying its link with cancer aggressiveness are urgently needed to develop new strategies for reducing prostate cancer morbidity and mortality,” the study authors concluded.

Hopefully this new finding will lead to favorable prevention of one of the most dangerous diseases we know: Cancer.

Source: University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston

Blog written by Marcus Miller/Robard Corporation


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Filed Under: For Dieters | For Providers | Obesity

The Best Time to Exercise for Weight Loss

by Robard Corporation Staff July 7, 2016


With the hectic, fast-paced lifestyle that many Americans live, oftentimes our conversations around exercise get stuck on where we can sneak in 10 minutes of physical activity between work and errands. While regular physical activity throughout the day is of course important to our overall health and well-being, when it comes to exercising for weight loss two things may be more of a factor than we ever imagined: Making the time and timing it right.

According to some recent studies, the time of day that you engage in exercise may actually help us maximize the effectiveness of our workouts. A 2010 study of 28 healthy adult men found that despite increasing the amount of calories and the amount of fat they consumed, the group that exercised first thing in the morning prior to eating breakfast managed to avoid any weight gain, in comparison to the group of men who consumed the same amount of fat and calories but who worked out after breakfast.

While it is a small and short-term study, the findings were very interesting in that they supported the idea that timing one’s workout to occur after a long period of fasting (or first thing in the morning) will support more rapid weight loss. The idea behind this is that your body will be geared toward burning your stored fat reserves, as opposed to utilizing its energy toward burning off the food you just ate.

Now, if you are like many, the idea of waking up one to two hours earlier to exercise may not sound appealing. But if you want to give it a shot to make the most of your workout, there are some simple things you can do to help you be a little bit more bright-eyed and bushy-tailed before a refreshing morning workout:

1. Go to sleep earlier: Easier said than done for many, but early to bed, early to rise!
2. Find a morning workout buddy: A friend can make drudging out in the morning a little bit more fun, plus you’ll have the pressure/motivation of knowing someone is waiting on you.
3. Set up your morning the night before: Before going to bed, set your coffee pot to brew when your alarm clock goes off (smell that caffeine!), lay out your gym clothes for a quick change, and have a pre-made pre-exercise snack ready to go. Once you convince yourself to get out of bed, you can be ready for the gym and out the door in 10 minutes or less, making it feel less like a drag.

Changing up your workout schedule may seem difficult at first, but after a few weeks of commitment and consistency, you may start to appreciate the benefits, not only for weight loss, but also with being able to start your morning off on a productive note. A morning workout can help to set the tone for the rest of the day, and you may find that it can support you in flourishing throughout many aspects of your work and personal life. Give it a try and let us know on Facebook what the difference has been in your mood and your health!


Source:
Business Insider


Blog written by Vanessa Ramalho/Robard Corporation

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Filed Under: Exercise | For Dieters | For Providers | Habits | Healthy Lifestyle | Setting Goals

5 Reasons We Don't Eat in Moderation

by Robard Corporation Staff July 5, 2016

When it comes to good eating habits a common term we hear is “eat in moderation.” But what does that mean? If I put a bag of chips in between two people and ask them to take out a moderate amount it’s unlikely they’d be the same. How different would the two be? Should they even be the same? Just what is “eating in moderation?”
 
A study conducted at the University of Georgia and headed by lead author Michelle vanDellen, sought out to find the true definition of moderate eating and how people in general viewed moderation. What they found was if on one end you had overeating and on the other end you eat as much as you should, our view of moderation lands somewhere in the middle.

Why is this an issue? “People are now saying, ‘Diets don’t work; you shouldn’t go on a diet. You should just live by the rule of moderation,’” says vanDellen, an assistant professor in the Franklin College of Arts and Sciences department of psychology. You are leaving the role of deciding what’s moderate in the hands of the consumer, and with the rise of the obesity rate it’s difficult to say that we are doing a good job in practicing moderation.

Researchers found that moderation is naturally seen differently depending on who you ask, and also depending what is being eaten. What are some deciding factors in what we consider moderate eating?


Source: University of Georgia


Blog written by Marcus Miller/Robard Corporation


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Filed Under: Eating Habits | Education | For Dieters | For Providers | Habits | Healthy Eating | Obesity

5 Ways to Teach Your Daughter about Healthy Weight & Body Image

by Robard Corporation Staff June 28, 2016


In the age of social media, the Internet, reality TV, and pop culture, women and girls face an enormous amount of pressure to look a certain way or be a certain weight. More now than ever, weight and body image concerns create an immense amount of anxiety for women, but increasingly more so for young girls. Girls’ dissatisfaction manifests around body image, particularly weight, at an alarmingly young age:

• Over 80 percent of 10-year-old girls are afraid of being fat.
• By middle school, 40-70 percent of girls are dissatisfied with two or more parts of their body, and body satisfaction hits rock bottom between the ages of 12 and 15.

And while it’s natural to be concerned about our daughters’ weight and to encourage them to be healthy, a recent study from Cornell Food & Brand Lab says that one of the best things you can do to encourage healthy weight and positive body image is … don’t talk about her weight!

The study published in Eating and Weight Disorders surveyed 501 women between the ages of 20 and 35 and asked them to recall how often their parent(s) commented on their weight. The findings showed that women whose parents were less likely to comment on their weight or how much food they ate were also less likely to be overweight as adults. Interestingly, women who recalled their parents commenting on their weight in their youth were generally more likely to be dissatisfied with their weight in adulthood, regardless of whether they were overweight or not.

“If you're worried about your child's weight, avoid criticizing them or restricting food. Instead, nudge healthy choices and behaviors by giving them freedom to choose for themselves and by making the healthier choices more appealing and convenient," recommends lead author Brian Wansink. "After all, it's the choices that children make for themselves that will lead to lifelong habits." 

If you are a parent and hope to encourage a healthy weight and positive body image in your daughter, there are many other ways to do so that won’t lead to unintended negative affects later in life. Take a look at the slideshow that suggest 5 positive ways to teach your daughter about healthy weight and body image.



Sources: Cornell Food & Brand Lab, NYC Girls Project


Blog written by Vanessa Ramalho/Robard Corporation


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Filed Under: For Dieters | For Providers | Healthy Lifestyle | Self Esteem

Robard is looking for Guest Bloggers

by Robard Corporation Staff June 20, 2016


As the Leaders in Weight Management, Robard Corporation offers the Robard Blog as a resource to dieters and medical/ non-medical weight loss professionals to provide helpful, inspiring, entertaining, accurate, and valuable information about health, wellness, weight loss, and obesity. We are looking to partner with current Robard customers, as well as other experts in the fields of health, wellness, obesity, and weight loss to submit articles in contribution to our mission to support healthy weight loss in overweight and obese individuals.

Topics we are interested in having guest bloggers cover include (but are not limited to):


• Medical and non-medical weight loss/ weight management
• New industry and scientific insights in weight loss and obesity
• Inspiring and motivational content for dieters
• Effective exercise, diet, and weight loss advice
• Obesity treatment success stories
• Operating a weight loss program/business
• Articles on comorbid conditions related to obesity, such as diabetes and heart disease

Please visit blog.robard.com to familiarize yourself with our blog, see recent topics, and imagine how you can contribute unique content.

Credit and Promotion

As a guest blogger, you will receive proper credit and promotion for your submission with:

• a prominently featured byline, containing a bio (50 words max), photograph, and a link to your business/professional website
• Your blog article, name, and credentials promoted in a custom graphic featured in the slider section of Robard.com’s homepage
• Distribution/ promotion of blog article to an email list of nearly 8,000 subscribers

With continued partnership, guest bloggers may also receive a featured interview as an industry leader in the Robard Blog and customer newsletter, and potential opportunities to be featured as a speaker in a future Robard webcast.

Criteria for blog submissions:

• No more than 450-600 words
• Conversational, but knowledgeable tone
• Submitted work must be previously unpublished
• Submission should contain up-to-date and accurate information
• Information and facts must be properly cited with reputable sources
• May include images, videos, slideshows, and other visual media to support the content (optional, to be used at Robard staff’s discretion)
• All submissions may be edited at the discretion of Robard staff for grammar, length, and style prior to approval for publishing to meet the editorial and brand standards of Robard Corporation

We are not interested in:

• Self-promotional content
• Anything that is offensive, politically controversial, or inaccurate
• Plagiarized content

**To be considered:

Send an email to guestblogging@robard.com with your name, title, business, phone number, email address, short bio (50 words max), and top 3 topics of interest with proposed headlines.

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Filed Under: About Robard | Blog | Education | For Providers | Weight Loss Business

What does Sugar, Potassium and Vitamin D Have in Common?

by Robard Corporation Staff June 7, 2016


They’ve all made it to the label. The food label that is! The FDA recently announced that they are making a few changes to Nutrition Facts Labels to help consumers make better informed food selections.

What was the issue with the current labels? Well, there isn’t necessarily an “issue,” but with new scientific evidence about nutrition, the FDA decided that the labels need to better reflect the current landscape of our nutritional needs.

So, what’s changed?

• Added Sugars will now be part of the label: It is recommended that we consume no more than ten percent of our caloric intake from added sugar. Well, how would we know? With the addition of added sugar, it will be much easier for you to stay within the recommended amount.
• Vitamin D and Potassium will be required to be on the label and Vitamins A and C no longer need to appear.  Research has shown that there is a general deficiency of Vitamin D and Potassium in our diets, as opposed to Vitamins A and C where people generally consume the daily recommended amount.
• Serving size will now reflect the amount of food or beverages currently consumed by people. For example, ice cream where a serving was ½ cup, it will be increased to 2/3 cup.  You will also notice the same product with two sizes having different labels, both showing one serving, such as 12 and 20 ounce bottles. In addition, type size for “Calories,” “Servings per container,” and “Serving size” will be increased with calorie amount and “Serving Size” being bolded.

While labels will change gradually, the deadline for all products is July 26, 2018. The big question is, how much of a change will we see in food selection with these updated labels?  And, how much will your buying decisions change?

If you want more information on the new Nutrition Labels, click here.


Blog written by Marcus Miller/Robard Corporation

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Filed Under: Education | For Dieters | For Providers

9 Tips on How to Eat Mindfully for Weight Loss

by Robard Corporation Staff June 2, 2016


When it comes to dieting, many people develop an adversarial relationship with food. Dieting often becomes about what you can or can’t eat … with all our favorite (junk and comfort) foods ending up on the chopping block. However, while watching what you eat is certainly important, more experts are pointing to HOW you eat as an important tool toward better eating. It’s called mindful eating, and it’s helping people rethink and shift their relationship to food.

Registered dietitian, Jenni Grover, describes mindful eating as “intuitive eating… a concept with its roots in Buddhist teachings, [which] aims to reconnect us more deeply with the experience of eating — and enjoying — our food.” No, you don’t have to be a Buddhist monk or meditate every day to be a mindful eater. Mindful eating is based on the idea that there is no right or wrong way to eat, but rather varying degrees of consciousness about what we are eating and why. The goal of mindful eating, then, is to base our meals on physical cues, such as our bodies’ hunger signals, not emotional ones — like eating for comfort. According to a recent article in the New York Times, mindful eating is not a diet, or about giving anything up. Rather, it’s about experiencing food more intensely — especially the pleasure of it.

Part of the reasoning behind mindful eating when it comes to health and weight loss is that it combats mindless or unconscious eating. Research shows that mindless eating plays a significant role in weight gain because we do not recognize when we’re actually full, causing overeating. However, when we eat mindfully, not only can we better experience the pleasure of the food we eat, we build more awareness around how much food we need to eat, as well as create opportunities to make healthier choices around food selection.

Thinking about trying it? Consider these 9 tips to start you off in exploring the concept of mindful eating, which are intended to help you slow down and pay attention to your meal:

1. Chew 25 times
2. Feed yourself with your non-dominant hand
3. Eat everything with chopsticks for a week
4. Put your fork down between each bite
5. Take your first bite with your eyes closed
6. Try to identify every ingredient in your meal
7. Put your food on a plate
8. Sit at a table
9. Eat in Silence

For a little more in-depth resource about mindful eating and how it can benefit your weight loss goals, check out this fun Infographic from the Summer Tomato blog, all about the benefits of eating mindfully.


Blog written by Vanessa Ramalho/Robard Corporation


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Filed Under: Eating Habits | For Dieters | For Providers | Habits | Healthy Eating | Hunger | Setting Goals

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