Mar
27
2015

Watch What You Eat, DON’T Eat What You Watch

Much of what we see on TV is for entertainment and shouldn't be seen as things we act out in real life. Who would have thought that one of those things is cooking? Food television networks often produce exquisite dishes prepared by professionals and amateurs, but when we bring these dishes out of the television and into our kitchen it can add to your waistline. 

A recent University of Vermont study of women aged 20 to 35 showed that women who recreate dishes they viewed on food-related television shows had a higher body mass index (BMI) and weighed on average 10 pounds more compared to women that gathered their food information from sources such as friends and family, magazines, or cooking classes.   

Why is this? According to co-author of the study, Brian Wansink, the dishes we see on food-related networks, “are not the healthiest and allow you to feel like it's OK to prepare and indulge in either less nutritious food or bigger portions.”

Do you know how many calories was in the last dish you saw made on food-related television? Me neither. We don’t really see the nutritional value that any of these prepared dishes have, we just know that it looks (and most likely tastes) good. But one thing we have learned with a level of certainty is taste, although important, isn’t the most crucial factor in preparing a healthy meal — a factor that we may neglect while admiring the dish. 

So where does this leave the food networks? Do they have a responsibility to prepare healthier meals? Or is it the viewer’s responsibility to be mindful of the dishes they see on TV and understand that they may not be the best choice to base a diet on? Maybe it’s a combination of the two. What do you think?

Source: University of Vermont

Mar
17
2015

Healthcare Providers Want to Learn More about Diet, Cardiovascular Disease Prevention

As the obesity epidemic continues to grow, it is imperative that healthcare providers and their patients are well versed in methods to combat the disease as well as associated comorbidities. And now, a recent survey shows the willingness of healthcare providers to increase their knowledge on this subject. 

A 28-question survey, created by a team from the NYU Langone Center for the Prevention of Cardiovascular Disease, was administered to more than 200 cardiologists and internal medicine physicians and trainees. The survey was created to find gaps in nutritional knowledge as well as evaluate the attitudes and practices of physicians in regards to diet and cardiovascular disease. What they found was the majority was open to additional training and thought it would improve their patient care. 

Most of the survey respondents — 78 percent — were open to additional training and thought it would result in better patient care. Just over half of the physicians said they currently spend three minutes or less educating patients on diet and lifestyle.

Overall, the survey sheds light on the physicians’ understanding of nutritional principles, their practical knowledge, and the frequency the provider refers a patient to a dietitian or nutritionist. (Most of the physicians didn't routinely refer their patients to a dietitian or nutritionist.) Information gathered from survey will hopefully help providers and ultimately help their patients. It’s a step in the right direction for us to better understand diet and cardiovascular disease and use the information to better treat and prevent comorbidities in patients.

“The fact that most physicians would welcome additional training in diet is a useful — and hopeful — finding of the study. It speaks to where we are now in medicine. Patients, too, are looking for additional ways to improve their cardiovascular risk,” says Nichole Harkin, MD, chief cardiology fellow at the NYU Langone Center for the Prevention of Cardiovascular Disease.

If you are one of the many healthcare professionals interested in increasing your knowledge of diet and lifestyle change for your patients, join us at the 7th Annual Obesity Treatment and Prevention Conference in Baltimore, July 23-25, 2015. It’s the most comprehensive conference available. Visit www.Obesity-conference.com to learn more. 

Source: NYU Langone Medical Center / New York University School of Medicine

Mar
9
2015

Variety by the Pound

If I gave you something, there isn’t much decision needed on your part on what you receive. However, what if I gave you two things and told you to choose one? That can tend to be a little more difficult.

Now take that analogy and multiply it by a million. The amount of food choices we have in the grocery store is staggering. And now researchers in the Virginia Tech College of Agriculture and Life Sciences and the Edward Via College of Osteopathic Medicine believe the results of a recent study show that too many food choices could lead to obesity.

The study was administered on mice but was one of the first to present a real life scenario of having to choose between certain foods — some healthier than others. Other experiments involving mice actually tried to show the correlation of the mother’s diet to her offspring — similar to how scientists study women’s diets during pregnancy to see if it negatively affects the diet of the child.

The study showed that when there was a choice between a high-fat or low-fat diet, the body weight, body fat and glucose levels of the mice rose. Mice that only received a low-fat diet had no change in such metrics.

Researchers believe this is a peek into how humans face these situations, and for us it can result in weight gain. However, it’s a choice. Even though there are a variety of unhealthy food options, there are plenty of healthy alternatives. It’s just a matter of what you choose.

Source: Virginia Tech

Mar
4
2015

2015 Obesity Treatment and Prevention Conference Offers 25.25 Available CE Credits

Dannemiller, supported by an educational grant from Robard Corporation, will be holding its 2015 Obesity Treatment and Prevention Conference from July 23-25, 2015. The 7th annual conference provides remarkable and unmatched insight into the world of obesity by some of the best minds in the industry.

With 30 obesity management lectures, the conference boasts a wealth of topics, including treatment of obesity-related eating disorders, optimal management of the pre-and-post bariatric surgery patient, the link between obesity and cancer, and many more.

25.25 available CE Credits will be available to attendees of the conference, making this an ideal event for physicians, surgeons, psychologists, nurses, dietitians, behaviorists, and other professionals to attend, as well as it being a great opportunity to network with numerous healthcare professionals throughout the country. 

This year, the conference will held at the Hyatt Regency Baltimore on the Inner Harbor in Baltimore, Maryland. For more information regarding agenda and speakers, testimonials, or to register for the Early Bird Rates, visit www.obesity-conference.com.

Also, click the image to take a look at the highlight video of last year’s conference for a peek into what the conference has to offer! 

Feb
12
2015

The New Era of Obesity Treatment

John Hernried, MD, FACP (pictured, left), provides some insights into what it’s like to dedicate a medical practice to treating weight loss exclusively, and how an obesity conference is an opportunity to learn the business as well as earn continuing medical education credits in the process. 

In recent years, there has been a confluence of factors that has made the business of treating obesity attractive to the medical community in the United States.

These factors include: the American Medical Association’s decision to recognize obesity as a disease in 2013; the statistics claiming millions of Americans are being classified as overweight or obese; and the rise of medical modalities to treat obesity including new medications, bariatric surgeries, and medical diets.

John Hernried, MD, FACP solely treats obesity at his practice, The Hernried Medical Weight Loss Center. Hernried and his staff take a comprehensive approach that addresses the whole person including the underlying causes of obesity with a team of providers that include dietitians, behavioral therapists, nurse practitioners, and exercise physiologists.

In addition to running a successful weight loss practice, Hernried is the course director of the 2015 Obesity Treatment and Prevention Conference that is going to be held July 23-25 in Baltimore.

Medical conferences such as the Obesity Treatment and Prevention Conference can be an excellent way for medical providers to learn, network, and begin a plan to offer medical weight loss in their practices, according to Hernried.

In this interview, Hernried talks about his medical weight loss practice as well as discussing why providers should consider attending the obesity conference this year. 

Can you talk about your practice and what you do in terms of treating obesity?
My practice is fully focused on treating obesity and the comorbidities associated with obesity, including disease states such as type 2 diabetes and heart disease. It’s been a practice that has been in existence for 30 years and I have been associated with the practice for the last 15 years.

We maintain a multi-disciplinary treatment model with a multiple provider care team that includes: dietitians, physicians, nurse practitioners, and exercise specialists. We all work together using several different treatment modalities, including intensive dietary therapy, behavioral management, surgery and pharmacological therapy--if it is indicated.

What made you decide to dedicate your practice to treating obesity?
I started off in primary care as an internist working in an office and a hospital. I came into practice during the "thin era," and I was taught that people with weight issues were simply lying to us. They were eating too much, not exercising, or simply being lazy. And yet, I saw the struggles of these patients including some with unmanaged diabetes, heart attacks, and other obesity-related health issues. And I would hear their stories when they came into the clinic, and I knew there had to be much more to it.

That’s when I started treating obesity as the core medical issue, and this has helped my patients with their other medical issues. Now, instead of adding new medications as part of patients’ regimens, I usually have them reducing their medications. That is a lot more fun for me when I can tell people to stop taking a medicine. 

We now know a lot more about obesity as a complex disease, and this provides me with a scientific interest in treating the disease. We have discovered some of the pathways to obesity and subsequently some newer treatments. For example, an existing diabetes medicine was recently approved for weight loss.

Can you talk about the importance of treating obesity as it relates to healthcare reform?
Yes, the obesity levels in the United States are at epidemic proportions, and they are not showing signs of improving. It is a huge cost not only to the healthcare system, but to employers. It has a dramatic effect on absenteeism in the workplace. One of the things we know is that for every dollar invested in obesity treatment it results in a four dollar return of investment in terms of reduced healthcare costs and improved productivity.

And of course there is also an immeasurable aspect to treating obesity, which is the improved quality of life for my patients.

Can you talk about the business of obesity? What are the advantages for medical providers to get into the obesity treatment field?
We know patients are searching for quality medical solutions for weight loss, and that patients really trust their medical providers. We are in an era where practices are increasingly strained in terms of revenue, and treating obesity can offer a great opportunity for medical providers to reach out to their own patients to help them lose weight and augment their practice; it can be a wonderful marriage between providers and patients.

We also see there is increasing reimbursement for obesity care, which didn’t exist before.

Lastly, there are many good options for weight management treatment, which include medications, surgery options, and medical diets.

Speaking about the business of obesity, you are the course director of the 2015 Obesity Treatment and Prevention conference, which will be held in Baltimore July 23-25. For those providers who are not currently treating obesity, but may be interested in doing so, do you recommend they attend a conference like this one?
I think this conference is ideal, because we give them an understanding of what is needed to begin a weight loss business. It also allows them to network with people who are practicing clinical weight management and can give them some insights into the business. The conference is less theoretical and more practical in terms of how to run an obesity practice.

How is this conference different from others?
This conference offers something for medical providers at every level. For those providers who are curious about offering weight management, they can come away with practical solutions to getting going; it is germane for those providers who are newer to the obesity business and have a small weight loss business already and want to learn how to grow their businesses; and it’s also for experienced providers who have been treating obesity for years, because this conference offers networking opportunities and discussions of new weight loss techniques.

There is an academic component to the conference, so continuing education is another important aspect to it.

Ultimately, we are looking to attract the interested clinicians who want to develop weight loss modalities as part of their practice and give them the direction they need at whatever stage they are in for their business development.

Registration is now open for the 2015 Obesity Treatment and Prevention conference. To register or find out more information about the conference, click here.

Interview by: John Parkinson, Clinical Content Coordinator, DiabetesCare.net.

Feb
10
2015

The "Hidden Cost" of Obesity

Obesity has turned into a billion dollar pandemic. According to a Cornell University study published in the Journal of Health Economics, the cost for obesity has been as high as $190 billion annually with no decrease in sight. Yet, beyond the obvious costs (medical bills for obesity-related conditions, for one), what about the “hidden costs” of obesity — the money that comes out of the pockets of overweight or obese individuals who might not even be aware of the money pit they’ve fallen into? Here are some examples of some “hidden costs” that can result from obesity:

More Food: It may be a simple concept, but the more you want to eat, the more food you have to buy. Even though the grocery store is where you most likely do most of your food shopping, hidden costs can come from other places — fast food, for example. Although a burger at a fast food joint may seem affordable at just a dollar or two, the amount you spend throughout the year at a drive-thru can add up quick and increase with additional eating occasions.

Bigger Clothes: More times than not, the higher the clothing size, the more expensive the clothes will be. One reason for this is that the cost of clothing rises due to the increased amount of materials needed to make it. In other words, the more the clothes cost to manufacture, the more the consumer ends up paying at the register. 

Transportation: You’d be surprised how weight affects the cost of transportation. Take airplanes for instance. In 2004, a report was published that stated that, due to the increase weight of passengers, airlines used an extra 350 gallons of jet fuel from 1990-2000. The number has since increased. Make no mistake: These additional costs are passed along to the consumer in the price of the plane tickets. And, there’s also the possibility of having to purchase a second ticket for seating depending on the policy of the airline and the passenger’s size and weight.

Work: Obesity is often accompanied by other health issues that need to be tended to and treated by a medical professional. Obesity-related illnesses contribute to absenteeism and reduced productivity, creating increased healthcare costs and negatively affecting a company’s bottom line.

These are just a few examples of the hidden costs that can come from obesity. However, just like the disease of obesity, hidden costs can be identified, controlled and reversed. It just takes a conscious effort.

Source: Harvard School of Public Health, Forbes, Daily Finance

Feb
2
2015

Get Back on Track

Here’s a scenario: You’re a month into the New Year and there’s a problem with your New Year’s resolution: You aren’t where you want to be with your weight loss. You set a goal, but at this point you’ve either stopped making progress or haven’t started at all. Anxiety might be setting in.

Don’t fret! Here are some things that you can do to regain control:


You’re still eating the same calories:
Sometimes we can be under the misconception that, just because we exercised, we can consume our regular amount of calories (or even more) and still reach our desired effect. The problem is that diet is just as important to weight loss as exercising; if you are consuming a high amount of calories, the calorie deficit benefits from exercise won’t be enough to see any significant changes in weight. Cut the calories.

Not enough volume: When adding muscle, the most important thing is to continuously add more reputations, weight, or both. The point is, as you build muscle, you must build resistance to continue to benefit. If you aren’t increasing your volume you’re leaving yourself susceptible to plateauing. Gradually add more weights and reps to your routine, but make sure you don’t overdo it. Slow and steady wins the race.

Where’s the cardio? Compared to other exercises, cardio is essential to weight loss because it allows you to burn more calories at an accelerated rate. Although JUST cardio won’t do the job, it should definitely be integrated into your regimen if you have your eyes set on losing weight. Take a walk, swim, or bike ride. Just get moving.

Get some help: If you don’t feel you are heading in the right direction, it may be a good time to call in the reserves. Whether it’s your personal physician, certified physical trainer, dietitian, or friend, there’s someone that can help you with the knowledge and support to get you back on track. You just have to look for it. Never be afraid to reach out.

Remember, falling off track or feeling like your goals are stalled is never a reason to give up completely. The sun rises each day to meet the challenges of a new morning. You can too.

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    Weight loss, nutrition, diet, exercise, education, support, maintenance. Whether you're a professional looking for information about Robard's weight management programs and products or a dieter looking to lose weight or maintain a healthy weight, read on for interesting, informational, and entertaining entries to meet your weight management needs.

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